Recently Read: Is the judicial review of Plan UMC biased?

Rev. Jeremy Smith

Rev. Jeremy Smith

Jeremy Smith at Hacking Christianity unpacks this weeks review of the PlanUMC reorganizational plan by the United Methodist Judicial Council:

In short, when the Judicial Council meets later this week, there’s two voices of support (or at least benevolent ambivalence from the Bishops) for PlanUMC–and no voices of opposition, as one would expect of a trustworthy process.

Smith expresses his concern that the process is rigged in favor of the plan and worries that the lack of dissenting voices will keep the Judicial Council from considering what Smith calls the “executive overreach,” which he believes killed the plan at the 2012 General Conference:

There’s a reason why PlanUMC was unsalvageable in 2012: this form of coercive fiscal and staffing power that is severely limited and contextual across the rest of United Methodism is pervasive in PlanUMC–and sadly it continues to be present in the 2016 version. No amount of tweaking will change that the basic understanding of power in PlanUMC is antithetical to the UMC in today’s world.

Click here to check out Smith’s full post.

Recently Read

Recently Read

Recently Read posts are stories the editors of The United Methodist Reporter have found interesting from other sites and wanted to share with our readers. The editors do not necessarily endorse the opinions shared in these stories, and referral here should not imply endorsement of that content.

Leave a Reply

5 Comments on "Recently Read: Is the judicial review of Plan UMC biased?"

applications-education-miscellaneous.png
The United Methodist Reporter wants to encourage lively conversation about The United Methodist Church and our articles in the belief that Christian conversation (what Wesley would call conferencing) is a means of grace. While we support passionate debate, we cannot allow language that demeans or demonizes others, and we reserve the right to delete any comment we believe to be harmful or inappropriate. We encourage all to remember that we are all broken and in need of Christ's grace, and that we all see through the glass darkly until that time we when reach full perfection in love. May your speech here be tempered with love, and reflection of the fruits of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. After all, "There is no law against things like this." (Galatians 5:22-23)
 
Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Richard F Hicks
Guest
Lawlessness is the best way to describe the UMC. People freely joined a system with clearly stated laws. Now each one ignores/breaks those laws which s/he doesn’t like AND gets away with it. This whole appointment system has been dead and stinking for thirty years. Yet for those not in power the appointment system is used as a club by the powerful. This is the kind of behavior which the Hebrew prophets were always fussing about. The only law that almost everyone obeys is: Who is In? Who is Out? Who is Up? Who is Down? No wonder that most… Read more »
George Nixon Shuler
Guest
In Kurt Vonnegut Jr.’s novel “Cat’s Cradle,” two shipwrecked sailors determined to take over a Caribbean Island which was a thinly disguised version of Haiti. One, McCabe, became the dictator. The other, Johnson, called Bokonon in the island dialect, became the spiritual leader and established the religion of Bokononism. But prior to their rises in their respective spheres, Johnson got McCabe to agree to outlaw Bokononism. That way, the spiritual path and avenues of power and control remained ever separated. How different Christianity would have been had a similar policy been enacted regarding it. As things are, legalism triumphs over… Read more »
james
Guest
Thanks for your post, Mr. Smith. Went to your blog site and read all that you said in your most current post. Good things!!! I am an old koot–been a member of the umc since before it was the umc. Seems to me the “Good News” has been hung up in the umc in perpetuity–in favor of– the social type gospel. After all, it is important that the children be taught how to cross the street correctly!! Until the umc gets back to “Christ born–lived–shed His Blood to wash all of us in that “soul cleansing flood”–died–buried–DEFEATED that old enemy… Read more »
Mary Page
Guest

Hmmm so what about the beginning of the process. The part the laity really does participate in. Where is it? How does it dove tail into the structure at the district level. We are not the Supreme Court with 8 dissenting opinions and 1 consensus. After all the whole is a consensus. May I suggest the only opinion that counts is Gods. IN all this where is it?

George Nixon Shuler
Guest

“The Good News” and “The Social Gospel” are one and the same. Attempts to separate them are de facto attempts to exploit the Divine in order to promote injustice and oppression. In the last sentence, the poster uses two terms inaccurately. “Political correctness” is a meaningless epithet which has never been a factor in United Methodism and neither has “radical feminism.”

wpDiscuz
Google+
%d bloggers like this: